Bill Speidel's Underground Tour

Buy Tickets Online: CLICK HERE

614 1st Avenue, in Pioneer Place Park, Pioneer Square, between Cherry and James Street.
Take the James Street Exit from Interstate 5.

206-682-4646

Where To Find Us

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614 1st Avenue, in Pioneer Place Park, Pioneer Square,
between Cherry and James Street.

From the south: From I-5, take the Dearborn/James St. Exit (164A). Take the the ramp to the right toward James St. Turn left onto James St. Turn right onto 1st Ave.


From the north: From I-5, take Exit 165A toward James St. Stay straight to go onto 6th Ave. Turn right onto Columbia St. Turn left on 1st Ave.

From the east: From I-90 W., take the I-5 N Exit, Exit 2C, toward Vancouver B.C. Take the James St. Exit. Take a slight right turn onto 1st Ave.

Where do I park?

Click Here for a Parking Map.

You are here

You’re sitting in cobblestoned Pioneer Place Park, with its famous glass and cast iron pergola, when you enjoy outdoor seating at Doc Maynard’s Public House. The striking pergola was a cable-car stop built for the 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, Seattle’s first world’s fair.

Here you’ll also see a huge authentic Native American totem pole in a one-of-a-kind little city park preserved in large part because of the efforts of the founder of the Underground Tour, historian and writer Bill Speidel.

Near the pergola, note the bronze commemorative manhole cover celebrating the Underground Tour’s anniversary and sporting a famous quote by Mr. Speidel.

The Underground Tour makes its home in the heart of the city’s oldest neighborhood, Pioneer Square. Explore cobblestoned parks, Victorian-era buildings, tiny Waterfall Park, art galleries, outdoor performance art and games, restaurants, boutique shops, and Smith Tower, Seattle’s most beloved skyscraper and once the tallest building outside New York.

“Skid Row,” originally “Skid Road,” was coined to describe Pioneer Square, where huge logs shoved from the highlands east of town skidded downhill and came to rest at Henry Yesler’s waterfront lumberyard, ready to be shipped around the nation and world.